Author Archives: Operational Support Officer

We are seeking a new Treasurer to join our Board of Trustees to help oversee and guide everything that West Norfolk Befriending does.

The Treasurer plays a major role in terms of organisational decision-making and developments.

Whilst experience of managing budgets and analysing financial data is not essential it would be helpful in the role of Treasurer.

Please download the role description for full details and instructions of how to apply.

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Our local MP for North West Norfolk, James Wild, asked to visit us and find out more about what we do.

James said: “West Norfolk Befrienders is one of the brilliant local charities making a positive difference to our community. It was encouraging to hear how they have adapted to continue to support people during Covid-19 and by providing a listening ear helping give people a link to the outside world.” There’s more information about James’ visit on his website.

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We are very grateful to have received generous donations of Personal Protective Equipment from local people and organisations.

We have received a generous donation of volunteer made fabric masks from Downham Market Town Council and door openers made by Michael Ford, a Marine Engineer from Downham Market.

We are very grateful to have been donated 20 face visors. These have also been made by Michael Ford and were distributed to us by King’s Lynn Lions. At the moment we have no plans to resume face to face befriending visits but are very grateful for the donation of PPE to use when we can.

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We have received these wonderful cards for residents at the four care homes we work with; Downham Grange Care Home, Burman House Care Home, Goodwins Hall Care Home and Fridhem Rest Home.

A very special thank you to Angela of Norfolk Linking Lives and the children of St Martins Primary School at Shouldham and the children at All Saints Primary School in Stoke Ferry. Also a huge thank you to the community around Downham Market as the cards were not exclusively from the school.

The cards have been beautifully designed with a little message inside. The cards were designed to be cheerful and bright so that the residents would feel happy when receiving them.

Sending these cards makes a huge difference to someone’s day and will hopefully reduce the feeling of being isolated from the outside world.

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We’re delighted to be part of Operation No Cold Shoulder offering support to ease isolation in partnership with Age UK Norfolk, Community Action Norfolk, Creative Arts East and Future Projects. Funding from this project allows us to offer Befriending in North Lynn and Dersingham. More information about Operation No Cold Shoulder is available on the Community Action Norfolk website.

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We are working with four Care Homes as part of the Care Home Connectors project, funded by the National Lottery Community Fund, to reduce social isolation for residents.

We received ear protectors knitted by Anne Sayell via the Angels of Kings Lynn group and postcards from Paul Macro Photography. The ear protectors are for Care Home staff to increase comfort while wearing PPE and the postcards are for each resident to write and send to their loved ones during the Covid19 lockdown while visiting is restricted.

We were very pleased to deliver ear protectors and postcards to Goodwins Hall in King’s Lynn, Burman House in Terrington St John, Downham Grange in Downham Market and Fridhem Rest Home in Heacham.

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West Norfolk Befriending have teamed up with the UK’s biggest electricity distributor to match the company’s trained volunteers with older people who may be feeling isolated by COVID-19.

Key workers at UK Power Networks have partnered with charities to launch a telephone befriending service aimed at tackling social isolation during the coronavirus pandemic. UK Power Networks befrienders will phone them regularly during work time through the company’s Donate a Day scheme, which gives over 6,000 employees two paid days annually to volunteer.

Pippa May, chief executive of West Norfolk Befriending, said: “We are a tiny charity facing increasing demand for our services so it’s incredibly exciting to work with UK Power Networks to transform the service we offer and reduce social isolation at this difficult time.

“On average we work with frail people in their nineties who may have outlived family and friends or don’t have family nearby. They are often housebound, so isolation is always there, but increased by lockdown because the few visitors they had, such as hairdressers, can’t come anymore.

“It makes a real difference to their quality of life having someone to chat with, who has time to listen. Any family they do have may be carers, but a befriender listens to them. My hope is that at the end of this lockdown the community continues coming together to tackle isolation. It doesn’t have to cost anything.”

Each volunteer is background checked to safeguard people. A priority for UK Power Networks during the pandemic is taking extra care of people in vulnerable households in the rare event of a power cut. Some 1.87 million eligible households have signed its Priority Services Register for the extra services the company provides in such emergencies, up 6% in the last year.

Kerry Potter, consumer vulnerability manager at UK Power Networks, said: “We are excited to work with our existing charity partners to provide additional support at a time when their resources are stretched and more people are contacting them hoping to form a social connection at a time when connections are much more difficult to establish.

“These charities are providing an invaluable service to customers in our highest risk groups who would be eligible to join our Priority Services Register and typically may be struggling with their energy bills. People who have been shielding during the coronavirus outbreak will have an increased awareness of how their mental health is affected by social isolation.”

The Priority Services Register provides free extra help during power cuts for pensioners, families with young children and people with special needs, disabilities or health conditions. For details visit www.ukpowernetworks.co.uk/priority, call 0800 169 9970, or email psr@ukpowernetworks.co.uk.

Romina Arefin, graduate innovation engineer at UK Power Networks, who is coordinating the company’s befriending service and taking part in the programme.

We were delighted to welcome Jennifer, UK Power Networks’ training support assistant, to our befrienders team. She’s written about her experience with us here:

Reaching out to people who are feeling vulnerable and alone has never been more important. So when my manager invited me to take part in UK Power Networks’ confidential new telephone befriending scheme, Donate by Dialling, I readily agreed to be connected with someone in need of kindness and friendship over the telephone at this difficult time.

Last week, following training and interviews, I was matched by a small charity, West Norfolk Befriending, with someone who wanted a friendly ear and to chat, something we may take for granted, but which others sadly lack.

I was born in Africa and moved across three continents before the age of nine, which gave me a lot of life experience. I have gained compassion, understanding and tolerance and have developed those qualities as I’ve got older.

My manager approached me as someone who she felt has the skills to take on this important role of supporting a vulnerable person in their home. It felt good to know that people felt I had right qualities to make a difference.

I have volunteered in different ways throughout my life. To volunteer is to give back. It’s really personal and quite subjective. We are all passing through this life and I believe that when we give something, we get something back ten-fold. It’s like a miracle happening, like an angel coming, just when you needed it.

West Norfolk Befriending is a really supportive charity which understands their customers’ needs and creates a supportive environment. I had two interviews before being matched with a person who has similar interests to me. We have family in the same areas. She has a dependent and is a carer for that person and I have an elderly mother and am a carer for her. We both enjoy gardening and the allotment.

We haven’t talked about those things yet and I spent our first call listening. She is chatty and my call gave her an opportunity to let it all out. It’s another outlet now for her. Before calling I find that meditating, for even five minutes, frees my mind so that I give her my full attention. I hope that my calls give her friendship, somewhere to park some of her anxieties and frustrations and know she has a friend at the other end of the phone to listen. She will know that I will call her regularly.

If you’re interested in volunteering with us, find out more and get in touch with us here.

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Carers Week is an annual campaign to raise awareness of caring, highlight the challenges unpaid carers face and recognise the contribution they make to families and communities throughout the UK.

About 75% of our clients have carers that benefit as a secondary outcome from delivering our befriending service. These could be a son or daughter living apart from their parent or a partner or spouse living in the same house. But many of these people wouldn’t consider themselves a carer. Our befriending service supports carers in many ways, both directly and indirectly.

Some of our clients that we work with are bedbound. If they live with a partner or spouse then they are an unpaid family carer. Often we match a befriender with the person being cared for, easing their isolation, but there is also a benefit to the carer. For the carer this gives them an opportunity to take a break, go in the garden or use the time to do a hobby. They also benefit from conversation and interaction with the befriender and the knowledge that their loved one is supported. Occasionally we match a befriender with the unpaid family carer. They may have become socially isolated as a result of their carer responsibilities and a befriender can help them become more socially active again.

I ring my Dad every night to make sure he’s OK. We’ve run out of things to talk about.

A befriender will listen to the stories that the carer has heard many times before. They do not have to worry about practical things like shopping, medication or laundry and so have the time and space to chat. The client will also have news from their befriender that they can share with their carer. A carer may visit their relative daily but knows that when the befriender is visiting then they are safe and have had some company that day. Befriending can revitalise and refresh client’s relationships with their carers.

West Norfolk Befriending are often able to offer other services and support for our clients and carers. Our befrienders build relationships with their clients and can gently suggest changes to the client, or we can feed information to the carer. Sometimes we’ve worked really closely with family carers behind the scenes to ensure very vulnerable clients are safe, and these have been fiercely independent clients who’d reject explicit offers of help. We’re proud that our befriending service supports both clients and carers.

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Volunteers Week takes place every year 1 – 7 June and it’s an opportunity to celebrate and say thankyou to volunteers across the UK. We have a fantastic team of volunteers doing everything from administration to helping with events, helping with our website and of course befriending. This post celebrates the work that our wonderful volunteers do – with words from them telling us why they love volunteering and the impact that their befriending has on their clients. Our volunteers visit clients in their own homes and Care Homes through the Care Home Connectors project. Now, during the Coronavirus pandemic, our volunteers are taking telephone befriending in their stride – continuing to make a massive difference for socially isolated older people in West Norfolk. Get in touch with us here if you’re interested in finding out more about volunteering with us.

One of the nicest things about Befriending is to make the client laugh. My current client says she wishes I could stay forever.

Our befrienders make a massive difference to their client’s lives, wellbeing and happiness – plus volunteering is rewarding for them aswell!

My client’s face lit up with delight when I took him to the seaside. He hadn’t been for two years since his illness.

Our volunteers ease isolation not only by bringing the outside in but also by taking clients out when possible. With a good match and a trusting relationship with their volunteer, our clients enjoy trips to the seaside, cafes and garden centres – plus to our social events where clients get to meet other volunteers, staff and clients.
“It is a privilege to be accepted by clients and trusted enough for them to talk to me. I love to see the difference over time that my visits make to the client, how they open up and readily take part in conversations.

It took a little while for my client to remember how to crochet but we managed to do some.

Our volunteers often spend time with their clients encouraging their hobbies and interests. Whether that’s crochet, reading or gardening our volunteers help to brighten our clients lives long after their visit.

The people running West Norfolk Befriending are warm and passionate, the clients appreciative and lonely. I now have clients who are friends and thoroughly enjoy the friendship of other Befrienders and the joy I bring to lonely clients.

Our clients all have such wonderful stories to tell and for most of them they have no-one who has the time to listen – that’s where we come in. My clients have had such varied careers such as coal miner, milliner, member of concert party in the war, one who travelled all over the world while she worked with British Airways and another who worked with the Bank of Australia in Melbourne. I have learnt a lot from our talks and have enjoyed the visits as much as the client.

Our wonderful volunteers give an amazing 3036 hours a year to listen to our clients stories.

I think befriending says it all; we provide social contact for people who live alone, we provide a listening ear and our time. This is why I am proud to be a volunteer for West Norfolk Befriending.

It’s so lovely to hear that our volunteers are proud to be a West Norfolk Befriending volunteer! We are very proud of our volunteers and the brilliant work that they do.
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